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Ken LongworthShrek: The Musical Jr

THE number seven has been very important in the lives of two of the main characters in Shrek: The Musical Jr – the title ogre and a princess.
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Shrek was sent away by his parents on his seventh birthday after being told he was old enough to find his own way in the world.

And Fiona was imprisoned in a tower when she was seven and has remained there because a dragon drives away knights who try to rescue her.

The two discover that they share more than a dislike of the number seven when circumstances lead them to meet in this colourful story.

The animated musical film Shrek was a worldwide hit when released in 2001 and was adapted for the stage in 2008.

The success of that show led to it being further adapted in 2014 to a 70-minute junior version for young performers.

Hunter Drama is staging Shrek: The Musical Jr with a predominantly teenage cast of 56 as a school holiday attraction at Newcastle’s Civic Theatre. There will be six performances over three days from September 29.

As well as an ogre, a princess and a dragon, the story includes many fairytale characters, including Pinocchio, the Three Little Pigs, the Big Bad Wolf, the Wicked Witch, Peter Pan, the Ugly Duckling, the Mad Hatter, Humpty Dumpty, a shoemaker’s elf and two bears.

The fairytale characters are ordered by a huge dwarf, Lord Farquaad, to leave the area around the royal palace and live in a swamp that has been Shrek’s home since his parents sent him away.

With the help of a friendly Donkey, Shrek heads to the royal palace to confront Lord Farquaad, who plans to become the country’s king, and meets Princess Fiona along the way.

The pair share some of the bright songs by David Lindsay-Abaire and Jeanine Tersori.

Tom Rodgers, who plays Shrek, said he had added a human side to the ogre so that he is more than a cartoon character.

He’s also had the tricky task of learning to walk normally while fitted with the ogre’s big stomach.

Phoebe Bayliss and Maisie Owens, who are alternating as Fiona, see her as more feisty than a typical Disney princess because she has been locked in the tower for so long.

Charlie O’Connell, as the Donkey, has a lot of energy, but also wants attention from those he meets.

And Rory Pollock, the tale’s Lord Farquaad, said he sees himself as the next big thing, in more ways than one.

Shrek: The Musical Jr, directed by Daniel Stoddart, has shows at the Civic on Thursday, September 29, at 10.30am and 2pm, and on Friday, September 30, and Saturday, October 1, at 2pm and 7pm. Tickets: $40 to $55. Bookings: 4929 1977.

A ‘HUMAN SIDE’: Tom Rogers as Shrek and Charlie O’Connell as his friend Donkey. Picture: MARINA NEIL

Going cashless? ‘Curse of Cash’ author Kenneth Rogoff says we have more of it than ever

In circulation. Photo: Image ForumWhat with myki cards, Opal cards, e-TAGs, epay, payWave, bitcoin and mobile phones, we’re using less cash than ever, right? Not on your life.
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The latest Reserve Bank figures show there were seven $5 notes per person in circulation in 2015, well up from five per person ten years earlier, and four 10 years before that.

(If those numbers seem small, but climbing, it’s because the same notes get used over and over. They are a bit like extras in a movie.)

We have around six $20 notes per person, close to a record high, and far more $50 notes than we used to (25 per person) because of their use in automatic teller machines. But it’s the use of $100 notes – the kind most of us hardly ever see, and the kind bank transfers should have rendered redundant – that is exploding.

Twenty years ago there were only five $100 notes per person in circulation. They were less common than $20 notes, which was appropriate given they were far less used. A decade later in 2005 after the introduction of the goods and services tax (the one we were told would kill the cash economy) we had seven per person, and now we have 12. A graph included in the latest Reserve Bank annual report shows the number of $100 notes in circulation climbing faster than any other denomination.

Note that I said “in circulation”. They are certainly not in day-to-day use. A few years back I was asked on ABC radio what colour they were. I had to guess, and I guessed wrong. Whereas the lobster-red $20 notes are always in and out of our purses and wallets and last about 12 years before being damaged and returned to the Reserve Bank, the Bank expects the typical $100 note to last 70 years. When they do come back they are often not even unbundled.

Who’s got them? According to The Curse of Cash released this week by influential US economist Kenneth Rogoff, they are mainly in the hands of drug lords, human traffickers and tax evaders. We are actually worse than the United States, according to Rogoff. Ninety-two per cent of our currency is in large denomination notes, compared to 84 per cent in the US. Only Switzerland, Israel, Norway and Russia use big notes more than we do.

Rogoff wants us to go “cashless”, at least for denominations above $10, and eventually he would turn the $10 note into a coin to make it harder to move around undetected. Phasing out high denomination notes would be painless, for those of us with nothing to hide. We would be invited to deposit them in banks in return for their full value up until a deadline, after which they would no longer be legal tender and worthless.

Naturally, there’s a catch. Our Reserve Bank, like the US Federal Reserve, makes money from issuing $100 notes. It’s conflicted, being in effect a silent partner in organised crime.

Peter Martin is economics editor of The Age 

What is so controversial about a climate ‘toolkit’?

Taking the toolkit approach. Photo: Gary MedlicottIn the topsy-turvy world of Australian politics, much of the environment movement is more attached to neo-liberalism than the Coalition government. While US President Barack Obama might have used air quality regulations and a moratorium on building new coal mines to get around a grumpy Congress, in Australia we are often told that only a “market-based mechanism” can be trusted to solve climate change. It can’t.
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This week the Climate Change Authority, to which Tony Abbott appointed Wendy Craik (ex-head of the National Farmers Federation), Kate Carnell (ex-Liberal chief minister and ACCI head) and John Sharp (ex-National Party minister and current National Party Treasurer), released a report which it provocatively titled Towards a Climate Policy Toolkit; Special Review on Australia’s Climate Goals and Policies.

What on earth could be provocative about a “toolkit”, I hear you ask. Well, for those who have spent a decade arguing that an economy-wide emissions trading scheme linked to global carbon markets delivers “least cost abatement”, plenty.

The idea that an emissions trading scheme is the “one true climate policy” is one of the last vestiges of the Kevin Rudd era and the highfalutin rhetoric about “evidence-based policy” and great moral challenges. To be clear, an emissions trading scheme is neither sinner nor saint, it’s just a policy idea with a patchy theoretical and empirical track record. A well designed ETS might be capable of driving rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at low cost, but we can’t say for sure because nowhere in the world has a well designed ETS been used to achieve such an outcome. But there are plenty of economists who aren’t worried about practice getting in the way of theory.

The CCA report is the last of three that were negotiated as part of Clive Palmer’s deal with Greg Hunt to pass his Direct Action legislation through the Senate. Not surprisingly, the CCA took as its starting point the climate legislation that currently exists and tried to build a bridge forward. While it might be possible to design a more elegant bridge by ignoring our inelegant starting point, such a design would be as irrelevant as it was well designed.

Big changes in policy impose significant transition costs on industry, consumers and the bureaucracy. Abbott’s determination to rip up the carbon price while retaining the expensive compensation was as costly as it was unnecessary. But the fact that the former prime minister was indifferent to the economic cost of his political symbolism is not a strong argument for why the current or future leaders should be similarly reckless.

Further, if the CCA did recommend the complete abolition of the Abbott government’s direct action scheme and its replacement with an emissions trading scheme along the lines of the one that cost Malcolm Turnbull the leadership in 2009, there would be zero chances of such a policy making it past the Liberal party room, let alone the Senate.

So what has the CCA recommended and why were its recommendations so controversial that two of its own board members have written a public critique?

In addition to straying from the “true path” of economy-wide emissions trading, the CCA has committed several other crimes against neo-liberalism. It proposes that good old- fashioned regulation is sometimes the most efficient way to solve a problem, it recommends that different sectors of the economy be treated differently (we used to call that “industry policy”), and that some industries be protected from unfair foreign competition (dare I say protectionism?).

Significantly, the diversity of mechanisms proposed by the CCA mirrors the diversity of challenges faced by Australian industry. As those who designed Rudd’s carbon pollution reduction scheme eventually discovered, the issues faced by the owners of rubbish dumps that leak methane are quite distinct from the problems faced by a chemical factory or a coal-fired power station.

One of the more novel proposals from the CCA is the creation of an “emissions intensity” trading scheme for Australian electricity generators as distinct from an emissions trading scheme for the whole economy. The differences between the two are both subtle and significant.

An economy-wide ETS sets an upper limit on the number of tonnes of pollution that can be released across the whole economy. In theory, companies need to buy a permit for each tonne of CO₂ they emit, but under Rudd’s CPRS, for example, big polluters were to be given 94.5 per cent of the permits they needed for free.

An EI scheme that covers only the electricity sector, on the other hand, doesn’t set a cap on the tonnes of pollution that can be emitted. Rather, it sets a cap on the tonnes of pollution per megawatt-hours of electricity produced. Confused? Don’t be. Just think about cars.

Imagine if the government set a cap for the average fuel efficiency of the car fleet owned by big Australian companies of 10 litres a 100 kilometres and legislated that the fuel efficiency standard would decline steadily to zero by 2040. If a company’s car fleet was using an average of 12 litres a 100 kilometres, the firm would either have to replace its thirstiest cars with more efficient ones or, buy “credits” from another company whose car fleet was averaging less than 10 litres a 100 kilometres. The only way for a company to meet a zero emissions target by 2040 would be to switch its whole fleet to electric cars.

This week, the CCA recommended that the emission intensity of the Australian electricity sector should fall to zero “well before 2050”. Put another way, the CCA recommended that all of Australia’s coal-fired and gas-fired power stations need to shut down and be replaced with 100 per cent renewable energy in the next 25 years. In the meantime, the CCA plan would require coal-fired power stations (which are already well above the proposed starting level of “emission intensity”) to buy credits (sound like a carbon price?) from low emission generators like solar and wind (sound like a subsidy?)

So if a Climate Change Authority with a majority of members appointed by Abbott is recommending a scheme that breaks with the tenets of neo-liberalism, supports a carbon price (by another name) and says we need to shut down all coal and gas-fired power stations “well before 2050”, why did some of the ALP appointees to the authority attack the integrity of both the report and their fellow commissioners?

Professor David Karoly and Clive Hamilton rightly argue that that government’s 26-28 per cent emission reduction target is inadequate if Australia is to pull its weight in global efforts to avoid dangerous climate change. They highlight that unless we take urgent action today, then we will use up so much of our “carbon budget” in the next few years that it will become nearly impossible to avoid blowing that budget in the future, and they are right.

The uncomfortable irony of the rejection of the CCA road map forward is, however, that if the current government doesn’t introduce an EI scheme in 2018, as the CCA recommends, then even more of the carbon budget will be used up in the next few years making it even harder to stay within the long-term carbon budget.

But, we are where we are. Australia has been dragging its feet on climate action for more than a quarter of a century. Neither Rudd’s 5 per cent emission reduction target for 2020, the current government’s 26-28 per cent target for 2030, or the CCA’s previous recommendation target for 40-60 per cent on 2000 levels by 2030 are consistent with a purely scientific approach to the problem. And, of course, neither major political party nor the CAA wants to discuss the fact that Australia sees building enormous new export coal mines as an essential part of our commitment to helping the world reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

A significant majority of the CCA members believe that giving the Coalition a way out of the climate policy cul-de-sac it is in, is worth the effort. While the decision of some members to criticise the report has attracted a lot of attention, the important question is whether or not a majority of the Parliament will agree with the majority of the CCA and conclude that in this climate progress is more important than protest. Time will tell.

Richard Denniss is the chief economist for The Australia Institute.

Twitter: @RDNS_TAI

Bill Shorten to skip Parliament for date with Canada’s Justin Trudeau

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will co-host a session with Bill Shorten at the Global Progress conference in Montreal. Photo: Adrian WyldEXCLUSIVE
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Just don’t ask Bill Shorten to explain quantum computing or perform any incredible feats of upper body strength.

After Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s week on the world stage it’s Mr Shorten’s turn: the opposition leader will skip two days of Parliament this week to rub shoulders with heartthrob Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, meet with officials in Washington DC and talk defence in Dallas.

Mr Shorten and Mr Trudeau will also co-host a session on the future of progressive politics at the Global Progress 2016 conference in Montreal. The Labor leader will no doubt be hoping some of Mr Trudeau’s star power rubs off.

Mr Trudeau is still riding high in the polls almost a year after he took power, unlike Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Mr Shorten will also deliver a speech at the conference focused on equality and fairness.

“Fairness isn’t some warm and fuzzy feel-good notion to benefit some – it’s a driver of economic growth,” he told Fairfax Media.

“This is something conservatives just don’t get. Good social policy is not just about a strong safety net, and it’s not a matter of charity.

“It’s about investing in lifting people back into work, in supporting their full participation in our economy and our society.”

The conference is also expected to be attended by US Vice-President Joe Biden, Italian Prime Minister Matteo​ Renzi​ and senior leaders from Germany, the United Kingdom and South America.

Google CEO Eric Schmidt and other business and charity leaders will also attend. Mr Shorten will meet with a number of the leaders on the sidelines of the event before heading to the United States.

Mr Shorten will meet with officials in Washington DC, just two months out from the US election.

The Labor leader has been deeply and publicly critical of Republican candidate Donald Trump, calling him “barking mad”. However he’s likely to attempt a more diplomatic approach when he’s on US soil.

In Dallas, Mr Shorten will tour Lockheed Martin’s Joint Strike Fighter facility. Australia is buying 72 of the next-generation fighter jets at a cost of at least $17 billion.

Mr Turnbull benefited from his time abroad last week, attending the G20 in China, the East Asia Summit in Vientiane and the Pacific Islands Forum in Micronesia. The trip allowed him to escape the domestic fray where the government is under pressure to reform the political donations system.

Mr Shorten will be abroad for five days, returning next Sunday.

Malcolm Turnbull and Barnaby Joyce at odds over new mining tax proposal

Barnaby Joyce, left, and Malcolm Turnbull appear to be divided over a proposed iron ore tax. Photo: Alex EllinghausenPrime Minister Malcolm Turnbull calls it “troubling” but his deputy Barnaby Joyce apparently doesn’t have a bad word to say about a West Australian plan for a new $7.2 billion mining tax.
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Mr Turnbull and Mr Joyce appear to have split over WA Nationals leader Brendan Grylls’ proposed iron ore tax hike.

While Mr Joyce was a leading critic of federal Labor’s now-defunct mining tax and has close ties to mining magnate Gina Rinehart, he appears to have an open mind on Mr Grylls’ controversial plan.

“Minister Joyce said the proposal was a matter for the state government and he would not run down any proposal that was designed to get a better deal for its constituents,” said a spokesman for Mr Joyce, who is currently acting PM.

WA Labor opposes the plan, in a reversal of the political positions taken on Kevin Rudd’s mining tax in 2010.

The apparent split has been exposed by the West Australian newspaper. Miners BHP and Rio Tinto are said to be infuriated by the proposal that would increase from 25¢-a-tonne to $5-a-tonne the “production rent” on iron ore, bringing in an estimated $7.2 billion over four years.

Speaking in Laos this week Mr Turnbull told the newspaper that Mr Grylls’ plan could damage investment in WA.

“It obviously sends a very troubling message to mining companies and other people considering making long-term investment,” he said.

“It’s a state issue, of course, but we view with great concern, as does the whole business community, the imposition of substantially increased taxes on particular, nominated companies.”

Federal Resources Minister Matt Canavan – a Nationals MP – has said he has “grave concerns” about the proposal.

Mr Joyce called Labor’s mining profits tax a “debacle” and a “shambles” and even criticised respected senior public servant Ken Henry for proposing it in his comprehensive tax reform review.

Grand designs: Inside Eddie Obeid’s unfinished Lebanese mansion

The stalled Lebanese mansion of the former Labor powerbroker Photo: Eryk Bagshaw Eddie Obeid leaves Darlinghurst Supreme Court in June. Photo: Christopher Pearce
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The living room of Obeid’s Metrit mansion. Photo: Eryk Bagshaw

Inside the stalled Lebanese mansion of former Labor powerbroker Eddie Obeid where 17 arches greet visitors. Photo: Eryk Bagshaw

The swimming pool Obeid was building for his grandchildren. Photo: Eryk Bagshaw

The villa is very Eddie.

Dominating a hilltop in northern Lebanon, the Obeids’ sandstone mansion features 17 archways, a domed roof, a swimming pool and a terraced garden. The master bedroom looks out towards an ancient grove of cedar trees. A lift well connects three storeys, including the basement “teenager’s retreat”.

Both Obeid’s ambition and taste for luxury are evident in the $US1.2 million ($1.6 million) renovation plan of the home bequeathed by his father.

“I want it to be a place my grandchildren can say, ‘This is where our grandfather was born’,” he said in 2013. “It’s a legacy to the family.”

Except the pool is empty, unlined, the staircase untiled. An overturned wheelbarrow rusts in one of the rooms upstairs. The “teenager’s retreat” contains a mouldy cushion, a lawn mower and wire.

Relatives in Obeid’s home village of Metrit say the renovation is in limbo. They have not seen the former Labor powerbroker and convicted criminal they call Edward for more than a decade.

A rare summer rain fell when Fairfax Media visited in late August.

“Press?” asked one villager, less used to tourists.

“Are you against Obeid?” asked a relative, wary of tales that have spread from the NSW Supreme Court to the village’s fig-covered lawns.

Another laughed while making a throat-slitting motion.

Metrit, population 100, with no transport and no school, is the ancestral home of the Obeids and many Lebanese-Australian families who fled during two decades of conflict between the 1970s and 1990s.

“Eddie done very well during the civil war,” said one of his relatives, who asked not to be named, after serving Fairfax Media a banquet lunch of tabbouleh, marinated eggplant, rice and supreme pizza.

“Too many people, their house had been destroyed, he talked to the government and took them over there to Australia.”

Obeid’s migration work made him a popular figure in the mainly Maronite Catholic village. He is also the reason a 40-house hamlet with no shop has a nine-person council.

He lobbied his Lebanese government connections for the village – ahead of other, much larger places – to become a municipality with hundreds of thousands of dollars in public funding for roads, electricity and water.

“You’re born here, you grew up here, that’s his village,” said the relative. “He was good to everybody.”

News, if not the finer details, of Obeid’s Australian court “troubles” have reached the village’s inhabitants, who are unlikely to see Metrit’s most famous political son anytime soon.

​Obeid, who recently suffered a stroke, had to surrender his passport last year to the NSW Supreme Court. He was tried over allegations he lobbied a maritime official without disclosing family business interests in Circular Quay cafes.

Convicted in June, he now faces a possible jail sentence. At the same time, Obeid and his son Moses face trial over a $30 million coal deal.

“Everyone can make a mistake,” says the relative. “No one deserves to be destroyed.”

Obeid still calls every month, says another, reflecting his emotional attachment to the village in which he and his five siblings were born.

In 2002, Obeid told Lebanese newspaper The Daily Star the Lebanese diaspora “not only feel nostalgia for their country” but also contribute to the country’s economic development.

But Obeid has also been accused of becoming too involved in local affairs.

More than a decade ago he intervened in a mayoral election to support a Shiite Muslim candidate over his Christian niece, Yolla Obeid.

Having requested two months’ parliamentary leave to attend to “urgent family business” in Lebanon, Obeid arranged for 22 people to fly in and vote for his preferred candidate. The politicking was allegedly an attempt to shore up Muslim support in case Obeid decided to enter Lebanese politics.

But signs suggest Obeid’s influence in a place 14,000 kilometres from Macquarie Street is on the wane. George Elias – a key Obeid backer who said in 2013 the authorities would “never get anything against him” – no longer serves as Metrit mayor.

And no work has been completed on the Obeid mansion for years, according to locals. Labourers were on site in 2013 but their abandoned work boots now house spiders.

Obeid declined to comment on the progress of his home. “You take the risk and write what you want,” he said,

One resident said there were no laws in Lebanon requiring completion of the home. The monument to the Obeid family could stand, incomplete, for decades in the town he once influenced from continents away.

ATO warns of phone scammers requesting payment for tax debts

The ATO is warning of telephone scammers. Photo: Erin Jonasson An ATO phone scam is doing the rounds. Photo: Ken Robertson KRZ
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The woman didn’t catch all of the threatening message on her elderly mother’s answering machine but the end part certainly caught her attention and left her frightened.

“Call this number or there will be consequences.”

The 82-year-old woman from Box Hill in Melbourne, who received the threatening call on Friday demanding she pay a “tax debt” over the phone, is just one of thousands of Australians being targeted by tax scammers.

“Part of the message had been cut off so I didn’t catch all of it, but I did catch the part about the consequences,” her daughter told Fairfax Media. “It took me by surprise, because I’m used to email scams but this call was quite brazen. It’s a disgusting message to leave on an elderly person’s phone.”

The call advised the woman to immediately phone a NSW number but the woman’s daughter, who did not want to be identified, said she suspected the call was a scam. “I thought I’d Google it first to get some background,” she said.

Her search revealed 19 other Australian households had been contacted by the same number within the week, all in regard to supposedly-outstanding tax debts or tax evasion.

The Australian Tax Office is reminding Australians to be wary of aggressive tax debt scams during tax time. From January to May this year, the ATO received more than 40,500 phone scam reports. It says more than 220 Australians were persuaded to hand over a total of $1.2 million to scammers.

Assistant Commissioner Graham Whyte said the ATO would never cold call about a tax debt. “We would never threaten you with jail or arrest, and our staff certainly wouldn’t behave in an aggressive manner,” he said.

Edwin and Annie Fabry, from Gold Coast, were told they had to pay $4300 in tax arrears.

“I told the man that I wouldn’t do any such thing over the phone and to put it in writing and mail it to our address, which he already had with our full name and home address,” Mr Fabry wrote in an online forum.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission urged Australians to hang up on tax scammers following a spike in the number of people reporting that they had lost money to tax scams this year.

More than $1 million was reported lost to the ACCC’s Scamwatch website in the six months to June 30. This compares to a total of $1.6 million lost to tax scams last year.

ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said the scams come in many guises but generally claim that the call recipient has underpaid their taxes and are required to replay the tax debt immediately or face frightening repercussions.

“Tax scammers are particularly aggressive so many people feel pressured to pay quickly without questioning them,” Ms Rickard said. “The most threatening scammers even say that police are on their way to arrest you but can be stopped if you pay immediately.”

She said scammers often use personal information found online to convince people of their legitimacy. They usually ask for payment for an “unpaid debt” via money transfer, credit card, direct debit cards or even iTunes cards, and calls appear to come from a local phone number but most use Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) phone numbers.

The numbers often look like Australian numbers, but are a proxy for a call made through an internet connection.

You can report suspected ATO email scams by forwarding the original email to [email protected]

You can also report scams to the ACCC via the Scamwatch report a scam page or by calling 1300 795 995.

AFL: Geelong v Hawthorn: It’s the Cats, posthumouslyPhotos

AFL: Geelong v Hawthorn: It’s the Cats, posthumously | Photos Isaac Smith of the Hawks reacts after missing a shot on goal after the siren to win the match during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)
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Cats players celebrate on the final siren during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Scott Selwood (left) and brother Joel Selwood of the Cats remonstrate with Sam Mitchell of the Hawks during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Players react after the final siren during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Hawks players look dejected after a loss during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Lincoln McCarthy of the Cats celebrates a goal with Tom Hawkins of the Cats during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Jack Fitzpatrick and Sam Mitchell of the Hawks look dejected after a loss during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Luke Hodge of the Hawks looks dejected after a loss during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Luke Hodge of the Hawks and Alastair Clarkson, Senior Coach of the Hawks line up for the national anthem during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Chris Scott, Senior Coach of the Cats speaks with Sam Menegola of the Cats during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Joel Selwood of the Cats hugs Patrick Dangerfield of the Cats during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Isaac Smith of the Hawks misses a shot on goal after the siren to lose the match during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Luke Hodge of the Hawks remonstrates with Andrew Mackie of the Cats during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Cats players celebrate on the final siren during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Joel Selwood of the Cats addresses his teammates during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Chris Scott, Senior Coach of the Cats looks on during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Patrick Dangerfield of the Cats handpasses the ball during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Scott Selwood (left) and brother Joel Selwood of the Cats remonstrate with Sam Mitchell of the Hawks during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

The Hawks line up for the national anthem during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Jordan Lewis of the Hawks runs through the banner during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Cyril Rioli of the Hawks takes a spectacular mark over Corey Enright of the Cats during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Scott Selwood of the Cats looks on with a bloodied eye during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Brendan Whitecross of the Hawks is tackled by Jimmy Bartel of the Cats during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Players react after the final siren during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Players react after the final siren during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Patrick Dangerfield (left) and Tom Lonergan of the Cats celebrate during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Luke Hodge of the Hawks runs onto the field during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Isaac Smith of the Hawks misses a shot on goal after the siren to win the match during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Cats players celebrate after Isaac Smith of the Hawks misses a shot on goal after the siren to lose the match during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

: Sam Mitchell of the Hawks and Scott Selwood of the Cats wrestle as Grant Birchall of the Hawks and Joel Selwood of the Cats look on during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Chris Scott, Senior Coach of the Cats congratulates his players during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Cats players celebrate after Isaac Smith of the Hawks misses a shot on goal after the siren to lose the match during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Hawks players look dejected after a loss during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Corey Enright of the Cats marks ahead of Paul Puopolo of the Hawks during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Brendan Whitecross of the Hawks is tackled by Sam Menegola and Josh Caddy of the Cats during the 2nd AFL Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 9, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

Tom Hawkins of the Cats and James Frawley of the Hawks compete for the ball during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Cyril Rioli of the Hawks celebrates a goal during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Jimmy Bartel of the Cats marks the ball during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Jimmy Bartel of the Cats is tackled by Ben McEvoy of the Hawks during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Daniel Menzel of the Cats celebrates a goal during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Mark Blicavs of the Cats and Luke Hodge of the Hawks wrestle at quarter time during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Cats players celebrate on the final siren during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Sam Mitchell of the Hawks is tackled by Sam Menegola of the Cats during the 2nd AFL Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 9, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

Tom Hawkins (left) and Lincoln McCarthy of the Cats celebrate during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

James Frawley of the Hawks spoils a mark by Tom Hawkins of the Cats during the 2nd AFL Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 9, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

Rhys Stanley of the Cats remonstrates with Sam Mitchell of the Hawks during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Luke Hodge of the Hawks and Umpire Dean Margetts share a discussion during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Paul Puopolo of the Hawks marks the ball during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Luke Hodge of the Hawks comes from the ground with a cut head during the 2nd AFL Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 9, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

Cats players celebrate after Isaac Smith of the Hawks misses a shot on goal after the siren to lose the match during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Steven Motlop of the Cats fends off a tackle by Ben Stratton of the Hawks during the 2nd AFL Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 9, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

Patrick Dangerfield of the Cats celebrates during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Cyril Rioli of the Hawks marks the ball during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Cyril Rioli of the Hawks celebrates a goal with Josh Gibson of the Hawks during the 2016 AFL Second Qualifying Final match between the Geelong Cats and the Hawthorn Hawks at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on September 09, 2016 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Adam Trafford/AFL Media/Getty Images)

TweetFacebookWhat a beautiful thing, when finals football between two great rivals not only lives up to, but exceeds expectations.

Geelong’s two-point win over Hawthornat the MCG on Fridaynight will be remembered as something special, ending, almost inevitably, with a kick for goal after the siren.

It was the Hawks’ Isaac Smith who took the shot and missed in front of 87,533 fans, a moment which will surely haunt the 27-year-old.

But the form shown by both these teams will be enough to have every other finalist shaking in their boots.

The Hawks ran out without forward James Sicily, who had fallen ill.

He was replaced by 20-year-old Daniel Howewho did not have a big impact on the game – not that Hawthorn were ever likely to lack fire-power in their forward-line.

Take this piece of play in the second quarter.

Paul Puopolobooted a lovely centring kick to the front of the Hawks goal to partner-in-crime Cyril Rioli, who tapped the ball out of the air into the the hands of Jack Gunston.

Looking good? Isaac Smith kicks for goal after the siren to win the game for Hawthorn. Photo: Getty Images

As if infected with the whatever Puopoloand Rioli had, Gunstonwas lightning-fast with his handpass toLuke Breustwho booted the goal from just metres out.

Where were Geelong’s defenders in all this?

They were around, but they were nowhere.

When Hawthorn plays this well, when they seem able to simply sense where their teammates are and respond accordingly, opposition players could almost be excused for simply shaking their heads – that is what the rest of us did.

There were other times however, where Geelong could have done more but were simply caught flat-footed.

Early in the third term Breust managed to break away from a scrambling pack in front of Hawthorn’s goal.

He chipped the ball to Gunston, who had been waited alonefor at least 10 seconds in the goal score and put the Hawks two goals in front.

The Cats were often the slower team and theirdefence could not match thedynamism of the Hawks’ attack.

Although the scores were close, for much of the game Hawthorn had much more of the ball and many more inside-50s.

It was in the third quarter that they really looked like they were going toslip away, showing on the scoreboard the dominance they had enjoyed around the ground.

Fans of the reigning premiers were on their feet as Rioli flew through the air for a beautiful overhead mark, which set Dunstanup for a goal.

But just when the Hawks seemed like a sure thing, Geelong surged, electrifying the MCG.

Consecutive goals from DanielMenzeland Lincoln McCarthy, from a brilliant, instinctive snap shot put them back within striking distance, then a third fromMark Blicavs from the goal square had Geelong two-points in front.

A controversial free kick to Breust gave him the opportunity to kick one of the goals of the night – 40m out, from beyond the boundary line and under plenty of pressure, the ball soared through the middle.

But just moments later and with seconds to go until the last break of the game,Motlopreturned the favour to put the Cats two points up.

Rioli put the Hawks four points up with a set shot just minutes in and Breust could have extended the lead had he kicked truly from 45m out on a 45-degree angle.

Patrick Dangerfield set Cameron Guthrie up for a quick goal for Geelong, only for Hawthorn’s great veteranShaun Burgoyneto send one scoring through at the other end.

This was edge-of-your-seat finals football, showcasing the skills of some of the best in the game and almost too tense to watch.

Geelong’s Josh Cowan hit the post from a set shot, whichcould have been costly, so too Motlop’s miss on the run.

But persistent, dogged teamwork put Caddy just metres on a tight angle and he goaled, the chant Gee-lon, Gee-long erupted around the ground.

What had seemed unlikely at halftime suddenly became a reality – Geelong took victory and Hawthorn would be forced to fight for their place in the rest of the finals.

GEELONG 2.3 5.5 10.9 12.13 (85)

HAWTHORN 1.2 6.6 10.7 12.11 (83)

GOALSGeelong:Caddy 2, McCarthy 2, Motlop 2, Hawkins 2, Guthrie, Menzel, Selwood, Blicavs.Hawthorn:Breust 3, Rioli 2, Gunston 2, Schoenmakers 2, Burgoyne 2, Hill.

BEST Geelong:Dangerfield, J Selwood, Guthrie, Blicavs, Menegola, Hawkins, Caddy, S Selwood.Hawthorn:Burgoyne, Lewis, Hodge, Rioli, Breust, Mitchell, Whitecross, Birchall.

INJURIESHawthorn:Burton (calf), Duryea (hand), Sicily (illness) replaced in selected side by Howe.

UMPIRESStevic, Meredith, Margetts.

CROWD87,533 at the MCG

2016 Spring Awakening festival in CessnockPHOTOS, VIDEO

Spring Awakening festival | PHOTOS, VIDEO The Cessnock City RSL Pipes and Drums Band leads the lantern parade down Cooper Street to kick off the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.
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The Cessnock City RSL Pipes and Drums Band leads the lantern parade down Cooper Street to kick off the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

Hundreds of people took part in the lantern parade at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

The Cessnock TAFE grounds were filled with lanterns, lights and fires for the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

The Cessnock TAFE grounds were filled with lanterns, lights and fires for the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

The Adrianna Mac Trio performed at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

Emmie Hallett and Michael Murphy at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

An interactive drumming workshop was part of the fun at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

Jessica Carmichael, Andrew Carmichael, Noah Attewell, Liz Attewell and Jaye Hoelscher at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

Front, Trudy Agunbiade and Olu Agunbiade, and back, Joanne Worthington and Lara Boyd at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

Cheryl Moore and Pat McCarthy at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

Kerry McKendry and Margaret Barr at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

Audrey Goodsir, Karen Goodsir, Macy Blake, Cleo Hunt and Lynn Burr at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

Gracie Lennard, Lochie Lennard, Jaxyn Brook, Isla Lennard and Bobby Schrader at the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

The Cessnock TAFE grounds were filled with lanterns, lights and fires for the Spring Awakening Festival in Cessnock on September 9.

TweetFacebookSpring Awakening lantern paradePost by Spring Awakening lantern parade.

Rio Paralympics day 2Photos

Rio Paralympics day 2 | Photos RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Brent Lakatos of Canada celebrates after winning the men’s 100 meter T53 final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)
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RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Sophie Hahn of Great Britain celebrates after winning the women’s 100 meter T38 on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at Olympic Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Atsushi Tomura/Getty Images for Tokyo 2020)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Song Maodang of China celebrates winning the gold medal in the Men’s 100m Butterfly – S8 Final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Liam Malone of New Zealand leaves the track after competing in the men’s 100 meter T44 final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Liam Malone of New Zealand, Jarryd Wallace of the United States and Jonnie Peacock of Great Britain compete in the men’s 100 meter T44 final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Gold medalist David Nicholas of Australia celebrates on the podium at the medal ceremony for Men’s 3km Pursuit C3 Final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympics at Rio Olympic Velodrome on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Bronze medalist Tiffany Thomas Kane of Australia celebrates on the podium at the medal ceremony for the Women’s 50m Butterfly – S6 on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Aurelie Rivard (L) of Canada and Sophie Pascoe (R) of New Zealand congratulate on winning the gold and silver medals after competing in the Women’s 50m Freestyle – S10 Final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: David Nicholas of Australia celebrates the victory and gold medal in the Men’s 3km Pursuit C3 Final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympics at Rio Olympic Velodrome on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Ben Weekes of Australia plays Tur Francesc of Spain in men’s singles on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Libby Clegg of Great Britain, with guide Chris Clarke, competes in the women’s 100 meter T11 on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Rory McSweeney of New Zealand competes in the Men’s Javelin F44 final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at Olympic Aquatics Centre on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images for the New Zealand Paralympic Committee)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Maroua Brahmi of Tunisia, Mounia Gasmi of Algeria and Gemma Prescott of Great Britain pose on the medals podium after the ceremony for the Women’s Club Throw – F32 Final on Day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Alexandre Loureiro/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Mary Fisher of New Zealand competes in the Women’s 100m Backstroke – S11 Final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Coan McKenzie of the United States celebrates winning the gold medal in the Women’s 50m Freestyle – S7 Final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Sophie Hahn of Great Britain celebrates after winning the women’s 100 meter T38 on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 9: Mariana Mohnen of Germany and Paola Klokler of Brazil during the Women Wheelchair Basketball match between Germany and Brazil at the Olympic Arena on Day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Lucas Uebel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Dylan Alcott of Australia plays Sharga Weinberg of Israel in men’s quad singles on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Juan Jose Mendez Fernandez of Spain competes in the Men’s 3km Pursuit C1 Individual Pursuit Qualifying on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympics at Rio Olympic Velodrome on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: (L-R) Hakim Ibrahimov and Elena Chebanu of Azerbaijan in action during the Women’s 100m – T12 Semifinals at the Olympic Stadium on Day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Alexandre Loureiro/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Mary Fisher of New Zealand competes in the Women’s 100m Backstroke – S11 on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Ellie Cole of Australia competes in the Women’s 400m Freestyle – S9 on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Brenden Hall of Australia competes in the Men’s 400m Freestyle – S9 Final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Friedemann Vogel/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Gold medalist Zhangyu Li of China celebrates on the podium at the medal ceremony for Men’s 3km C1 Pursuit Final on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympics at Rio Olympic Velodrome on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – SEPTEMBER 09: Dirk Passiwan #11 of Germany stretches to block Jake Williams #2 of the United States on day 2 of the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games at on September 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

TweetFacebookKurt Fearnley is fired up for for his final Paralympic [email protected] “I have my family over there in the stands and my other family in the village with me. It is awesome” pic.twitter杭州m/asKBbEWGk1

— Kate McLoughlin (@katemcloughlin4) September 9, 2016Live event tracker: Follow the 2016 Rio Paralympics here.